Providence

GREEN PORNO: SNAIL




ESPS 
Experimental Sculpture and Painting Studio 
Incoming Student Exhibition 
Opening: Thursday, October 23, 5-7pm SME, Room 201 
Featuring recent works by first year MFA students: 
Trevor Amery, Michael Ano, Seth Ferris, Adela Goldbard, Audrey Hope, Morgan Manduley, Amy Reid, Joshua Saunders, Patrick Shields, Patricia Zambrano 
The Experimental Sculpture and Painting Studio supports the active investigation of new approaches to making. Through visiting artist lectures, exhibitions, production-based workshops and collaborations, ESPS provides a platform for the exploration of unconventional fabrication methods and rigorous inquiry into the nature of 2- and 3-D object-making. 




Image: Bingo Balls, Amy Reid 

If you are in the San Diego aria next Thursday pop on by the ESPS and see some great work from UCSD First year MFAs!!!!

ESPS

Experimental Sculpture and Painting Studio

Incoming Student Exhibition

Opening: Thursday, October 23, 5-7pm SME, Room 201 

Featuring recent works by first year MFA students:

Trevor Amery, Michael Ano, Seth Ferris, Adela Goldbard, Audrey Hope, Morgan Manduley, Amy Reid, Joshua Saunders, Patrick Shields, Patricia Zambrano

The Experimental Sculpture and Painting Studio supports the active investigation of new approaches to making. Through visiting artist lectures, exhibitions, production-based workshops and collaborations, ESPS provides a platform for the exploration of unconventional fabrication methods and rigorous inquiry into the nature of 2- and 3-D object-making.

Image: Bingo Balls, Amy Reid 

If you are in the San Diego aria next Thursday pop on by the ESPS and see some great work from UCSD First year MFAs!!!!

Catalyst Lab Collaboration

I am supper stoked to be part of the Catalyst Lab at UCSD!  A Communications PhD and I are beginning a collaboration working with the notion of Skin. We sat down yesterday to discuss ideas and a trajectory for our research.  To gain momentum we are going to start by going through specific readings one at a time and unpack them through discussion and writing,  but also by each doing a 30 minute drawing a day.  

Stay tuned for the drawings!!!! 

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?
What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.
Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”
As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.
“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”
Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique →

ucresearch:

Why are human faces so unique?


What’s in a face? The amazing variety of human faces — far greater than that of most other animals — is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study out of UC Berkeley.

Behavioral ecologist Michael J. Sheehan explains that our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

In the study, Sheehan and coauthor Michael Nachman asked, “Are traits such as distance between the eyes or width of the nose variable just by chance, or has there been evolutionary selection to be more variable than they would be otherwise; more distinctive and more unique?”

As predicted, the researchers found that facial traits are much more variable than other bodily traits, such as the length of the hand, and that facial traits are independent of other facial traits, unlike most body measures. People with longer arms, for example, typically have longer legs, while people with wider noses or widely spaced eyes don’t have longer noses. Both findings suggest that facial variation has been enhanced through evolution.

“Genetic variation tends to be weeded out by natural selection in the case of traits that are essential to survival,” Nachman said. “Here it is the opposite; selection is maintaining variation. All of this is consistent with the idea that there has been selection for variation to facilitate recognition of individuals.”

Human faces are so variable because we evolved to look unique

Through a glass,darkly @ space4art. San Diego

Erika Ostrander
From the middle of the cloud, I call your name
2014